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20130416
20130416
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
'll give him a lawyer, lawyer up, get miranda. >> oh, yeah. now, a couple of things about that. they have suggested that there's an exception to miranda for public safety which we all know there is. i think they've been very extravagant in assuming they'll get the largest possible exception under the law and the reality is in different circuits that exception is interpreted differently. >> if they think they don't have to give the guy the miranda rights, you have the right to remain silent and right to an attorney, they think we have a big exemption, before they wofer that and try to get all of the information from the person and it may come back to bite them because some jurisdictions don't see it that way. >> absolutely right. in some places if you're a dangerous offender you get a long exception. in others, it doesn't matter how dangerous you are, if police basically rendered you-- >> what should happen. if we identify the person what do you think as a doj think next. >> in the person fits the definition of enany combatant, al-qaeda affiliate or someone we're at war with, that presiden
this person without reading miranda rights because -- >> you're saying in foreign custody? >> even in u.s. custody there are situations now where a lot of people would say, you don't need to read miranda rights right away. this decision -- if a very strong suspect is picked up or somebody could provide significant information, i think that decision, whether or not to mirandize could be -- >> presumably as the fbi is going through this, they are looking to make sure there are no secondary attacks, first priority, right, imminent threat. >> absolutely. >> and second of all, to make sure they maintain the possibility of ultimately getting a criminal conviction? >> absolutely. >> joining us is an eyewitness to the bombing. he ran the marathon and was in the medical tent when the explosions happened. joining us by phone from boston. describe what you were doing in the medical tent at what time and what the scene there was like. >> yeah. the first thing, this was wave three, so i was running -- i was a charity runner, so we started at approximately 10:40 a.m. then i finished just under four,
there are situations now where a lot of people are saying you don't need to read the miranda rights right away. if is strong suspect is picked up, or could provide significant information, i think that addition could be discussed between doj, fbi, the white house -- >> presumably as the fbi is going through this, they are looking to make sure no secondary attacks is the first priority, and then to make sure they maintain the possibility of getting ultimately a criminal conviction. >> absolutely. >> joining us now is an eyewitness, greg, ran the marathon and was in the medical tent with the explosions happened. he joins us by phone from boston. greg, zwrieb describe what you were doing in the medical tent at what time and what the scene there was like. >> yeah, the first thing to share, this was wave three, so i was a charity runner for the alzheim alzheimer's association. we started at 10:40 a.m., and i finished my first under four. hi pushed pretty hard in mile 25 and 26, what that means i was winded and dizzy, i was ready to faint. as i crossed the finish line one i asked for medical assista
a person of interest because you don't want to do that because it might invoke some rules of miranda, was the person in custody, was a custodial interrogation. if a prosecution comes forward can they get somebody who was tried in the case. an phone can come back and throw this statement or this confession or this statement out because the rights were violated of this individual. i think that's really important. i think it's significant that they at least were saying person of interest, someone they were questioning. the burns i think is also indicative somebody was very close to the blast point. that's important. >> one second. we will get back to the panel in a second. there's a press conference at massachusetts general hospital of which we were just speaking and we will take that. >> right now the hospital is operating in a business as usual mode with the exception just of some heightened security, of which i am sure you are aware. >> questions for the doctor? >> the nature you are of the injuries? >> these are blast-type injuries. these are very high force, high impact type injuri
suspect, what changes about me legally? >> everything. the fifth amendment, mayor randa -- miranda rights, in terms of being so identified as someone who was being looked at and so he is probably interviewed as a witness, as a victim. but at the same time, and it's constitutional, give american authorities the right to look at every part of his life if they get lawful subpoenas. i'm confident the f.b.i. will get this guy. 1-800-494-tips. >> brian: thanks. coming up straight ahead, our next guest recorded history. pictures from the attack, a photographer in the boston globe here live next. >> steve: our coverage continues of the boston bombings. but there are other stories. first of all, a fox news alert. a u.s. marine helicopter crashed -- has crashed in south korea overnight near the north korean border. all 21 people on board are alive and being treated at the hospital. the military says the super stallion chapper made a hard landing while conducting routine flight operations. the crew is from okinawa in japan. >>> a short time ago, a major earthquake in iran, killing at least 40 people
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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